Ariodante

Synopsis

Scene: Medieval Scotland

Precis:

Ginevra, the daughter of the King of Scotland is in love with and betrothed to Prince Ariodante. She rejects the amorous advances of Duke Polinesso, who cruelly tricks Ariodante and Ginevra's father into believing that Ginevra has been unfaithful. Ariodante attempts suicide and Ginevra is condemned to death, but after a challenge to a duel by Ariodante's brother, the dying Polinesso admits his plot and the lovers are reunited.

 

Act 1

A room in the palace

Princess Ginevra, in front of her mirror, is adorning herself to make herself beautiful for her beloved. (Aria:Vezze, lusinghe). Polinesso, Duke of Albany, bursts into the room and, thinking that having the king's daughter as his sweetheart would advance his prospects, declares his love for her. Ginevra indignantly rejects him (Aria:Orrida a gl'occhi miei) and leaves. Dalinda, who is secretly in love with Polinesso, advises him that his rival is Prince Ariodante but also advises him that all he has to do is open his eyes to see someone else who loves him (Aria:Apri le luci).Left alone, Polinesso can see that Dalinda is in love with him and plans to use her to thwart his rival and win Ginevra for himself (Aria: Coperta la frode).

The royal gardens

Ariodante sings of how all nature speaks to him of love (Aria:Quì d'amor). Ginevra joins him and they pledge their love (Duet: Prendi, prendi da questa mano). The King joins the lovers, gives them his blessing, and orders his courtier Odoardo to make the preparations for the wedding (Aria: Voli colla sua tromba). Alone, Ariodante swears to be faithful to Ginevra (Aria:Con l'ali di costanza). Polinesso hatches his plot - he tells Dalinda that if she will dress as Ginevra that evening and invite him into her apartments, he will be hers (Aria:Spero per voi). Lurcanio, Ariodante's brother, then appears to Dalinda and declares his love for her (Aria:Del mio sol vezzosi rai) but she has totally lost her heart to Polinesso (Aria:Il primo ardor).

A delightful valley

Ariodante and Ginevra enjoy the beauties of nature and each other's company (Duet: Se rinasce nel mio cor). They are joined by shepherds and shepherdesses (Duet with chorus:Si godete al vostro amor) who dance to entertain them (Ballet).

 

Act 2

A moonlit night. Ancient ruins, with the moonlight illuminating the secret entrance to Ginevra's apartments

Polinesso and Ariodante meet; Polinesso feigns astonishment when Ariodante tells him he is betrothed to Ginevra, insisting that Ginevra loves him. Ariodante refuses to believe it. This is all being observed by Lurcanio, who is hidden. Polinesso tells Ariodante to watch as "Ginevra", really Dalinda wearing Ginevra's clothes, admits Polinesso into her bedroom for the night. Ariodante is in despair and wants to die(Aria:Tu preparati a morire) but Lurcanio comes from the shadows and advises Ariodante to live, and seek revenge (Aria:Tu vivi). Ariodante sadly bewails his beloved's (supposed) infidelity (Aria:Scherza infida). As day breaks, Polinesso and Dalinda emerge from the palace. Polinesso promises he will reward her, to her delight (Aria:Se tanto piace al cor) and, alone, Polinesso exults in how well his plot is proceeding (Aria:Se l'inganno).

A gallery in the palace

As the King is making the final arrangements for his daughter's wedding, the courtier Odoardo brings him bad news - Ariodante has been seen committing suicide by leaping into the sea. The King is heartbroken (Aria:Invida sorte avara). Ginevra appears, having a premonition of some approaching calamity (Aria:Mi palpita il core). When her father gives her the terrible news, she swoons and is carried away. Lurcanio now appears before the King, who attempts to comfort him on the loss of his brother. The furious Lurcanio, however, hands the King a letter telling him he saw Ginevra admit Polinesso into her bedroom for the night, which caused his brother to kill himself, and Lurcanio now is bent on revenge (Aria:Il tuo sangue). The King disowns his daughter and condemns her as a harlot. When Ginevra hears this, she collapses into delirium (Aria:Il mio crudel martoro) and all Dalinda's attempts to console her fail. Ginevra falls into a fitful, disturbed sleep (Ballet of Good and Bad Dreams). She awakes in distress (Recitativo accompagnato:Che vidi? oh Dei! misera me!)

 

Act 3

A wood near the sea

Ariodante did not drown when he leapt into the sea, and he bitterly rebukes the gods for condemning him to live (Arioso:Numi! lasciarmi vivere). Hearing cries, Ariodante finds Dalinda, who is being held by thugs hired by Polinesso, with orders to kill her, as she is the only witness to his plot to discredit Ginevra. Ariodante drives Polinesso's henchmen away, and Dalinda reveals the truth to him - it was she, disguised as Ginevra, who let Polinesso into her bedroom. Ariodante rails against the treachery that caused him to doubt his beloved (Aria:Cieca notte). Alone, Dalinda expresses her remorse (Aria:Neghittosi or voi che fate?).

The royal gardens

The King tells Odoardo that he will never see his daughter again unless a champion appears to defend her honour. Polinesso steps forward and offers to challenge Lurcanio to a duel (Aria:Dover, giustizia, amor). Ginevra, condemned to death for sexual irregularity, appears before her father begging to be allowed to kiss his hand (Aria:Io ti bacio). Her father clasps her to her bosom, saying that a champion has appeared to defend her - Polinesso. She does not like this idea, but he insists (Aria:Al sen ti stringo e parto). Ginevra prefers death to the loss of her honour (Aria:Sì, morrò). Lurcanio again offers his love to Dalinda, and she indicates that she is now inclined to accept it (Duet: Dite spera, e son contento).

The dueling ground, the King on his throne

Polinesso and Lurcanio fight, Lurcanio mortally wounds Polinesso who is carried away by Odaordo. A new champion appears with his visor down. He reveals himself as Ariodante, to the astonishment of all, and declares Ginevra innocent. Dalinda admits her part in the plot. Odoardo returns with the news that Polinesso, as he died, also admitted his guilt. The King pardons Dalinda and goes to find his daughter. Ariodante jubilantly hails a new bright day dawning after nights of darkness (Aria:Dopo notte).

The room where Ginevra is imprisoned

Ginevra looks death in the face (Arioso:Manca, oh Dei!). But her father and the others appear and declare her vindicated.She is reunited with her beloved Ariodante (Duet:Bramo aver mille vite).

The great hall of the palace. A large staircase supported by columns; on the upper part of the stairs musicians playing wind instruments.The King, Lords and Ladies descend the staircase. He begins the chorus, as the Lords and Ladies dance.

Chorus (Ogn'uno acclami bella virtute) and (Ballet).

Program and cast

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November 2019

Vienna State Opera

Public Transport
 

Subway lines: U1, U2, U4
Trams: 1, 2, D, J, 62, 65
Buses: 59A
Local Railway: Badner Bahn
Stops: Karlsplatz / Opera

Taxi stands are available nearby.
 

Parking



Parking is only € 6, - for eight hours!

The Wiener Staatsoper and the ÖPARK Kärntner Ring Garage on Mahlerstraße 8, under the “Ringstraßengalerien”, offer the patrons of the Vienna State Opera a new, reduced parking fee. You can park in the Kärntner Ring Garage for up to 8 hours and pay only a flat fee of € 6, -. Just validate your ticket at one of the discount machines inside the Wiener Staatsoper. The normal rate will be charged for parking time greater than 8 hours. The validation machines can be found at the following coat checks: Operngasse, Herbert von Karajan-Platz, and the right and left and balcony galleries.

Important: In order to get the discount, please draw a ticket and do not use your credit card when entering the garage!

After devaluing your ticket in the Wiener Staatsoper you can pay comfortably by credit card or cash at the vending machines.

The machines accept coins and bills up to 50.- Euro. Parking time longer than 8 hours will be charged at the normal rate.
 

History



The structure of the opera house was planned by the Viennese architect August Sicard von Sicardsburg, while the inside was designed by interior decorator Eduard van der Nüll. It was also impacted by other major artists such as Moritz von Schwind, who painted the frescoes in the foyer, and the famous "Zauberflöten" (“Magic Flute”) series of frescoes on the veranda. Neither of the architects survived to see the opening of ‘their’ opera house: the sensitive van der Nüll committed suicide, and his friend Sicardsburg died of a stroke soon afterwards.

 

On May 25, 1869, the opera house solemnly opened with Mozart's Don Giovanni in the presence of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth.
The popularity of the building grew under the artistic influence of the first directors: Franz von Dingelstedt, Johann Herbeck, Franz Jauner, and Wilhelm Jahn. The Vienna opera experienced its first high point under the direction of Gustav Mahler. He completely transformed the outdated performance system, increased the precision and timing of the performances, and also utilized the experience of other noteworthy artists, such as Alfred Roller, for the formation of new stage aesthetics.

 

The years 1938 to 1945 were a dark chapter in the history of the opera house. Under the Nazis, many members of the house were driven out, pursued, and killed, and many works were not allowed to be played.

 

On March 12, 1945, the opera house was devastated during a bombing, but on May 1, 1945, the “State Opera in the Volksoper” opened with a performance of Mozart's THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. On October 6, 1945, the hastily restored “Theaters an der Wien” reopened with Beethoven's FIDELIO. For the next ten years the Vienna State Opera operated in two venues while the true headquarters was being rebuilt at a great expense.

 

The Secretary of State for Public Works, Julius Raab, announced on May 24, 1945, that reconstruction of the Vienna State Opera would begin immediately. Only the main facade, the grand staircase, and the Schwind Foyer had been spared from the bombs. On November 5, 1955, the Vienna State Opera reopened with a new auditorium and modernized technology. Under the direction of Karl Böhm, Beethoven’s FIDELIO was brilliantly performed, and the opening ceremonies were broadcast by Austrian television. The whole world understood that life was beginning again for this country that had just regained its independence.

 

Today, the Vienna State Opera is considered one of the most important opera houses in the world; in particular, it is the house with the largest repertoire. It has been under the direction of Dominique Meyer since September 1, 2010.

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